development studies

Critical Theory, Practice-oriented Skills, and Affective Learning

Kearrin Sims It has long been recognised that development studies must strike a balance between a critical (perhaps radical) interrogation of development, and the delivery of practical skills for undertaking development work. These two undertakings are, of course, interrelated. Good development practice is informed by a sound understanding of relevant theory, and theoretical debates need to be attentive to shifts in policy and practice. As Harris notes, development studies seeks to both understand ‘how and why the social world is constituted’, and to provide strategies and interventions that are intended to bring about change (2005: 18).

By |2020-09-20T07:27:44+10:00September 20th, 2020|Uncategorised|Comments Off on Critical Theory, Practice-oriented Skills, and Affective Learning

State Responses to COVID-19: a Global Snapshot at 1 June 2020

Nichole Georgeou and Charles Hawksley Development studies educators seeking to assist students understand how different states around the world reacted and responded to COVID-19 in the first few months of the pandemic are advised of a new, free, 132-page report —State Responses to COVID-19: a Global Snapshot at 1 June 2020. Published by the Humanitarian and Development Research Initiative (HADRI) at Western Sydney University, and edited by HADRI Director, Associate Professor Nichole Georgeou (WSU) and Dr Charles Hawksley (UOW), the collection represents the work of over 70 academic and professional contributors from across the world, linked through their research connections

By |2020-08-03T00:30:45+10:00August 2nd, 2020|Uncategorised|Comments Off on State Responses to COVID-19: a Global Snapshot at 1 June 2020

DSAA Blog Launch: Learning and teaching in development studies

The more radical the person is, the more fully he or she enters into reality so that, knowing it better, he or she can transform it. This individual is not afraid to confront, to listen, to see the world unveiled. This person is not afraid to meet the people or to enter into a dialogue with them. This person does not consider himself or herself the proprietor of history or of all people, or the liberator of the oppressed; but he or she does commit himself or herself, within history, to fight at their side.- Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of

By |2020-07-27T11:26:27+10:00July 25th, 2020|Uncategorised|Comments Off on DSAA Blog Launch: Learning and teaching in development studies

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